Go To Explore Turkey Home

Explore Turkey Pictures for Mevlana :: Celebi


Explore Turkey Chapters

Mevlana :: Celebi

Celebi

In time, his followers, his devoted friends and all those who had received inspiration and blessing from proximity to his spiritual presence began to adjust to the loss of Mevlana. They faced the question of how to organise themselves in the event of his death. Rather than allowing the ideas of their mystical leader to die with him, they determined to incorporate them into a system which could be taught to future generations. The person chosen to guide the community of friends and followers in his stead is, his spiritual successor, Husameddin Celebi, who took up the post as the leader of the Mevlevi community with the agreement of all its members, including Mevlana's son, Sultan Veled. Husameddin Celebi sat on the pelt of the community's founder-the Celebi pelt, (later symbol of the sheyh in the Mevlevi convent) and administered; the estates attached to his mausoleum. On his death, the post of Celebi was taken by Sultan Veled, who was sixty years of age when he attained that post and had been instructed by the mystic Begtimuroglu Seyh Kerimuddin. He was not only a mature sufi, but also a skilled organiser. He was possessed, furthermore, of a creative spirit, and it was through him that the revolutionary ideas of Mevlana were popularised and spread. He founded the greater community of the Mevlevis, and made the tomb of the founder in Konya, their spiritual centre. His works, including a 'Divan', three poetical Mesnevis, entitled the Ibtidaname Rebabname and Intihaname and a work of prose entitled 'Maarif' are important contributions to early Turkish Anatolian literature. Sultan Veled died in 1312 at the age of eighty-six, and. was buried alongside his father, Mevlana, at Konya. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ulu Arif Celebi.

When Arif Celebi took the post of head of the Mevlevi, he was forty years of age. His early education had been at the hands of Mevlana himself, after which he was trained by Celebi Husameddin. He travelled throughout Anatolia several times during his father's lifetime, and was much loved wherever he went. He contributed a great deal to the foundation and early development of the Mevlevi as an order, and was also the author of an anthology. He too, was buried in the tomb of Mevlana on his death in 1320.

On Ulu Arif Celebi's death, his brother Semseddin Emir Alim; then on his death in 1338 his other brother Husameddin Vacid Celebi succeeded to the Celebi Throne-pelt. Subsequent holders of the post came from the line of Ulu Arif Celebi. The Mevlevi order as such was actually organised under the leadership of Adil Celebi, the second pir, who died in 1460, and who was responsible for formulating the rites and practices of the Mevlevi as a religous group.

During its formation as an order, the Mevlevi also became firmly established in Anatolia, and later throughout the Ottoman empire, through the patronage of leading members of society, including important statesmen and even sultans. At one point, a line of Mevlevi descendence was even established through the Ottoman dynasty, when Devlet Hatun, the daughter of Yakup Han, a Germiyan descendent of Sultan Veled's daughter, Mutahhara Hatun, married Bayezid the Thunderbolt, providing a matrimonial link between the two lines. The Ottoman Mevlevi line was later established with the birth of Celebi Muhammed to Devlet Hatun. Later sultans maintained this hereditary link. Mehmet the Conqueror is known to have a close relationship with the Mevlevi pir, Cemaleddin Celebi, the son of Pir Adil Celebi. He was also a frequent pilgrim to the tomb of Mevlana, which he restored, and granted a number of endowments to the order. His son, Bayezid II bestowed a number of favours on Cemaleddin Celebi personally, and totally restored Mevlana's tomb, providing it with the ornamentation in its present form. During the time of the Mevlevi Sheyh Husrev Celebi, the son of the Kadi Mehmet Pasha, Selim the Grim visited the tomb several times, through his benevolence, a fountain was built in the grounds of the Mevlevi convent at Konya, and various endowments were granted to members of the order. During the reign of Suleyman the Magnificent, an assembly hall- semahane- was built on to the mausoleum along with a mescid- or chapel mosque. During the same period, the tombs of Mevlana and Sultan Veled were embellished with marble cataphalques and the wooden cover originally belonging to Mevlana's tomb was placed over that of his father. Ahmet I, himself a poet, who wrote under the pseudonym Bahti, was closely attached to Mevlana. He wrote the lines which read: "Bahti, the devoted slave of the throne (seat) of Mevlana, the true throne of the sultan of the world".

Cells for the dervishes, kitchens and other buildings were added to the convent complex by Murad III and Mehmet III during the same time of the Sheyh Ferruh Celebi. Murat IV visited the tomb of Mevlana on his way to Iran in 1635 to pray for the success of his Iranian campaign, when he granted endowments to the convent and favours to the Celebi himself, including three sable mantles. Two years later, however, when Murad IV made a second pilgrimage to Konya, the kadizade displayed such animosity towards the Mevlevi that they were not afforded the royal respect given them on previous visits, and Ebubekir Celebi was exiled to Istanbul.

During the 17 and 18th centuries, under the administration of Huseyin, Abdulhalim, Karabostan, Sedreddin and Arif Celebis, the Mevlevi maintained a generally close relationship with the court, received successive endowments from the Ottoman sultans, and founded many new dergahs -convents -throughout Anatolia and beyond. These, and the Mevlevi zaviyes -small dervish lodges -and asithanes -important centres of the order -were all administered from Konya, which was considered the axis of the order.

Haci Mehmed Emin Celebi, occupant of the Celebi Throne -postnisin -of the Mevlevi convent in Konya, during the reign of Selim III, left the post of sheyh to his nine -year -old son, on account of his frailty after spending thirty years as head of the order. His chosen successor -halife -Mehmet Said Hemdem Celebi, who was duly appointed by Mahmut II through the intercession of Emin Celebi's friend and companion Haled Sait Efendi, went to Istanbul to receive his official appointment with the approval of the order and returned to Konya to be invested as a sheyh. As his father had died, he took up the post of leader of the order immediately, inheriting his father's position on the pelt of the sheyh. He very quickly displayed a maturity and organisational skill quite unexpected in a boy of his age, and proceeded to rule the convent and the order successfully for 45 years. He won the support and favours of both Mahmud II and Abdulmecid, who were both sympathetic towards the order and founded an important library in the dergah at Konya. Many of the leading poets and authors of the day were attracted to Konya during his time as sheyh. He himself was the author of an anthology. He was also responsible for a number of repairs to the convent. Hemdem Celebi was one of the most outstanding sheyhs of the order, who contributed to its development as an order over a period of half a century. Of him it was said:

Arrival at Konya Sems Beyond Sems Selahaddin the Goldsmith Celebi Husameddin Death of Mevlana Mystical Theologyof Mevlana Mevlana's Place in Mystic Literature Mesnevi Divan-i Kebir Fihi Ma-Fih Mecalis-i Seb'a Mektubat Founding of the Mevlevi Celebi Mevlevi Order Hierarchy Castigatory Retraet Dervishhood Seyh Sema Ritual Tomb of Mevlana Prayer-Rugs-seccade Dervish Lodge and Annexes Celebi Apartments Meydan-i Serif Seb-i Arus Pool Hurrem Pasha Mausoleum Hasan Pasha Mausoleum Sinan Pasha Mausoleum Mehmet Bey Mausoleum Places of interest in Konya Associated with Mevlana Marc'al-Bahreyn Mevlana's Cell Mausoleum and Mescid of Sems Plan of Mevlana Museum Map of Konya and its Surrounding In time, his followers, his devoted friends and all those who had received inspiration and blessing from proximity to his spiritual presence began to adjust to the loss of Mevlana. They faced the question of how to organise themselves in the event of his death. Rather than allowing the ideas of their mystical leader to die with him, they determined to incorporate them into a system which could be taught to future generations. The person chosen to guide the community of friends and followers in his stead is, his spiritual successor, Husameddin Celebi, who took up the post as the leader of the Mevlevi community with the agreement of all its members, including Mevlana's son, Sultan Veled. Husameddin Celebi sat on the pelt of the community's founder-the Celebi pelt, (later symbol of the sheyh in the Mevlevi convent) and administered; the estates attached to his mausoleum. On his death, the post of Celebi was taken by Sultan Veled, who was sixty years of age when he attained that post and had been instructed by the mystic Begtimuroglu Seyh Kerimuddin. He was not only a mature sufi, but also a skilled organiser. He was possessed, furthermore, of a creative spirit, and it was through him that the revolutionary ideas of Mevlana were popularised and spread. He founded the greater community of the Mevlevis, and made the tomb of the founder in Konya, their spiritual centre. His works, including a 'Divan', three poetical Mesnevis, entitled the Ibtidaname Rebabname and Intihaname and a work of prose entitled 'Maarif' are important contributions to early Turkish Anatolian literature. Sultan Veled died in 1312 at the age of eighty-six, and. was buried alongside his father, Mevlana, at Konya. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ulu Arif Celebi. When Arif Celebi took the post of head of the Mevlevi, he was forty years of age. His early education had been at the hands of Mevlana himself, after which he was trained by Celebi Husameddin. He travelled throughout Anatolia several times during his father's lifetime, and was much loved wherever he went. He contributed a great deal to the foundation and early development of the Mevlevi as an order, and was also the author of an anthology. He too, was buried in the tomb of Mevlana on his death in 1320. On Ulu Arif Celebi's death, his brother Semseddin Emir Alim; then on his death in 1338 his other brother Husameddin Vacid Celebi succeeded to the Celebi Throne-pelt. Subsequent holders of the post came from the line of Ulu Arif Celebi. The Mevlevi order as such was actually organised under the leadership of Adil Celebi, the second pir, who died in 1460, and who was responsible for formulating the rites and practices of the Mevlevi as a religous group. During its formation as an order, the Mevlevi also became firmly established in Anatolia, and later throughout the Ottoman empire, through the patronage of leading members of society, including important statesmen and even sultans. At one point, a line of Mevlevi descendence was even established through the Ottoman dynasty, when Devlet Hatun, the daughter of Yakup Han, a Germiyan descendent of Sultan Veled's daughter, Mutahhara Hatun, married Bayezid the Thunderbolt, providing a matrimonial link between the two lines. The Ottoman Mevlevi line was later established with the birth of Celebi Muhammed to Devlet Hatun. Later sultans maintained this hereditary link. Mehmet the Conqueror is known to have a close relationship with the Mevlevi pir, Cemaleddin Celebi, the son of Pir Adil Celebi. He was also a frequent pilgrim to the tomb of Mevlana, which he restored, and granted a number of endowments to the order. His son, Bayezid II bestowed a number of favours on Cemaleddin Celebi personally, and totally restored Mevlana's tomb, providing it with the ornamentation in its present form. During the time of the Mevlevi Sheyh Husrev Celebi, the son of the Kadi Mehmet Pasha, Selim the Grim visited the tomb several times, through his benevolence, a fountain was built in the grounds of the Mevlevi convent at Konya, and various endowments were granted to members of the order. During the reign of Suleyman the Magnificent, an assembly hall- semahane- was built on to the mausoleum along with a mescid- or chapel mosque. During the same period, the tombs of Mevlana and Sultan Veled were embellished with marble cataphalques and the wooden cover originally belonging to Mevlana's tomb was placed over that of his father. Ahmet I, himself a poet, who wrote under the pseudonym Bahti, was closely attached to Mevlana. He wrote the lines which read: "Bahti, the devoted slave of the throne (seat) of Mevlana, the true throne of the sultan of the world". Cells for the dervishes, kitchens and other buildings were added to the convent complex by Murad III and Mehmet III during the same time of the Sheyh Ferruh Celebi. Murat IV visited the tomb of Mevlana on his way to Iran in 1635 to pray for the success of his Iranian campaign, when he granted endowments to the convent and favours to the Celebi himself, including three sable mantles. Two years later, however, when Murad IV made a second pilgrimage to Konya, the kadizade displayed such animosity towards the Mevlevi that they were not afforded the royal respect given them on previous visits, and Ebubekir Celebi was exiled to Istanbul. During the 17 and 18th centuries, under the administration of Huseyin, Abdulhalim, Karabostan, Sedreddin and Arif Celebis, the Mevlevi maintained a generally close relationship with the court, received successive endowments from the Ottoman sultans, and founded many new dergahs -convents -throughout Anatolia and beyond. These, and the Mevlevi zaviyes -small dervish lodges -and asithanes -important centres of the order -were all administered from Konya, which was considered the axis of the order. Haci Mehmed Emin Celebi, occupant of the Celebi Throne -postnisin -of the Mevlevi convent in Konya, during the reign of Selim III, left the post of sheyh to his nine -year -old son, on account of his frailty after spending thirty years as head of the order. His chosen successor -halife -Mehmet Said Hemdem Celebi, who was duly appointed by Mahmut II through the intercession of Emin Celebi's friend and companion Haled Sait Efendi, went to Istanbul to receive his official appointment with the approval of the order and returned to Konya to be invested as a sheyh. As his father had died, he took up the post of leader of the order immediately, inheriting his father's position on the pelt of the sheyh. He very quickly displayed a maturity and organisational skill quite unexpected in a boy of his age, and proceeded to rule the convent and the order successfully for 45 years. He won the support and favours of both Mahmud II and Abdulmecid, who were both sympathetic towards the order and founded an important library in the dergah at Konya. Many of the leading poets and authors of the day were attracted to Konya during his time as sheyh. He himself was the author of an anthology. He was also responsible for a number of repairs to the convent. Hemdem Celebi was one of the most outstanding sheyhs of the order, who contributed to its development as an order over a period of half a century. Of him it was said: "There may emerge many as pirs, many initiates, many chosen elders to the order, but non such as Hemdem will come again as leader (veli) to the lodge."

In 1832, when Konya was occupied by the Egyptian armies of Mehmet Ali Pasha, under the command of Ibrahim Pasha, Hemdem Celebi went to Istanbul. In doing so he affirmed his allegiance to the Ottoman throne, and so won the sympathy of Abdulmecid once again.

Ibrahim Pasha, after taking Konya, appointed Hemdem's son, Celaleddin Celebi as sheyh, but he was removed from the post by his father on his return to Konya after the retreat of the Egyptian army. In 1859, Hemdem Celebi died, leaving his post to his second son, Mahmud Sadreddin Celebi. The latter remained head of the order for 22 years. During his time in office, the convent endowments were renewed, the green tiles of Mevlana's tomb restored, and restorations also carried out in the convent kitchens, the dervish cells and the fountain. One of his most important acts was to contribute food from the convent cellars to help victims of the famine of 1873, in a campaign run by the governor of Konya, Esad Pasha. After the death of the much-loved Sadreddin Celebi in 1880, the elders and Celebi-sheyhs of the order throughout Anatolia called for the appointment of his brother Fahreddin Celebi, then sheyh of the Mevlevi convent in Manisa. At the command of Abdulhamid he was duly appointed, with the approval of the seyhulislam- the head of the Moslem mosque-and esconced as sheyh in Konya with great ceremony. But on his death just a year later, in 1882, his brother was appointed to take his place. Mustafa Safvet Celebi, the son of Hemdem Celebi, proved an extremely mature mystic leadership, during whose time of office restorations were carried out at the dergah. He was succeeded by his younger brother Abdulvahid Celebi on his death in 1887. Abdulvahid Celebi remained at the head of the order for 20 years, and was much loved in Konya, although he was kept under constant surveillance by Abdulhamid II, was repeatedly informed upon by the governors of Konya, Ali Sururi and Ferid Pasha of Avlonya, and was prevented from leaving Konya during his time in office.

Abdulvahid Celebi died in 1907 and was succeeded by his son, Abdulhalim Celebi, during the time of the formation of the Second Constitution. In 1909 he was succeeded by Bahaeddin Veled (Izbudak), the son of Mustafa Necib Celebi, during whose period of office First World War broke out. That sheyh led a volunteer regiment of Mevlevi -the Mucahidin-i Mevleviyye- from Konya to Damascus, with the intention of taking part in the Suez campaign, but disbanded it without having attained any great military successes on the defeat of Germany. Towards the end of 1919, Abdulhalim Celebi again took the pelt of leadership, but was succeeded seven months later by Amil Celebi, son of the sheyh of the Aleppo Mevlevi, Yakub Celebi, only to return to the post for a third time on the death of Amil Celebi about a year later. On 23 rd April, 1923, Abdulhalim Celebi was appointed a member of the newly-formed national congress for Konya, and became second leader of the house. After the declaration of the Republic, in 1925, he left his post as head of the order and died in Istanbul in the same year. Veled Celebi was appointed in his place, but with the dissolution of the mystic orders in 1925, the post of Celebi was also abolished.

 



Above text and pictures are from the book titled "Mevlana and the Mevlana Museum".

You can purchase "Mevlana and the Mevlana Museum" book and other Turkey related books from Explore Turkey Bookstore.

Bookstore

Explore Turkey Bookstore

Accommodation / Hotels / Rooms


Package / City Tours

Explore Turkey Package / City Tours



Explore Turkey is an IstanbulNet project.
You can search & reserve hotel rooms, city tours, blue voyages, private yachts and cabin charters at Explore Turkey.
This site is about Turkey, hotel, hotels, hotels in Istanbul, travel to Turkey, accommodation, blue, voyage, hotels istanbul, istanbul hotels.
You can contact us @ istnet@exploreturkey.com.
Bookstore |  DereTepeDuzzz :: ATV Riding & Nature Trips in Turkey |  Araç Takip :: Vehicle Tracking
Page Rank